bullying

Kids with Behavior Issues, Disabilities are Bullied More, Bully Others More

Kids with Behavior Issues, Disabilities are Bullied More, Bully Others More

Students receiving special-education services for behavioral disorders and those with more obvious disabilities are more likely to be bullied than their general-education counterparts; and are also more likely to bully other students, a new study shows.

Different Dynamics At Play In Cyberbullying Than Traditional Bullying

Different Dynamics At Play In Cyberbullying Than Traditional Bullying

New research from UBC has discovered a distinct difference between the dynamics of cyberbulling and traditional school yard bullying. The researchers suggest children don’t equate cyberbulling with the traditional concepts and actions of bullying. Of the youth questioned for this study, 95% of those who claimed to be cyberbullies stated their actions were intended as a joke, while only 5% reflected that their actions were for the purpose of harming another individual. This suggests the majority of those involved in cyberbullying down play the impact of their actions on their victim.

High School Bullies More Likely To Be Substance Users

High School Bullies More Likely To Be Substance Users

A new study released by researchers for Ohio State University points to increased substance use for bullies of middle and high school age. The research demonstrated that bullying was more prevalent within the middle school age group, and an increased substance use was seen in high school aged bullies. Additionally, victims of bullies were more likely to embark in fairly frequent substance use, with alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use being cited as most commonly used.

Teens With Depression More Likely To Be Bullied

Teens With Depression More Likely To Be Bullied

It is widely assumed that bullying leads to depression in children and teens, however new research from Arizona State University suggests the opposite could also be true. Teens who are depressed have greater difficulty in developing peer relationships, and this can often lead to bullying. The authors suggest parents and teachers look for signs of depression within children and understand that depression can be a significant risk factor for negative peer based relationships.