postnatal depression

Postpartum Depression Spans Generations

Postpartum Depression Spans Generations

Exposure to social stress impairs a mother’s ability to care for her children and can negatively impact her daughter’s ability to provide maternal care for future offspring, a new study shows.

Low-income Pregnant Women in Rural Areas Experience High Levels of Stress: Mothers’ and Babies’ Health at Risk

Low-income Pregnant Women in Rural Areas Experience High Levels of Stress: Mothers’ and Babies’ Health at Risk

A new study indicates low-income pregnant women in rural areas experience high levels of stress yet lack appropriate means to manage their emotional and physical well-being.

Maternal Depression Affects Language Development in Babies

Maternal Depression Affects Language Development in Babies

Maternal depression and a common class of antidepressants can alter a crucial period of language development in babies, according to a new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia, Harvard University and the Child & Family Research Institute (CFRI) at BC Children’s Hospital.

Blood Test Could Show Women at Risk of Postnatal Depression

Blood Test Could Show Women at Risk of Postnatal Depression

Researchers at Warwick Medical School have discovered a way of identifying which women are most at risk of postnatal depression (PND) by checking for specific genetic variants. The findings could lead to the development of a simple, accurate blood test which checks for the likelihood of developing the condition.

Lasting Impact On Mental Health For Women Who Have Miscarried

Lasting Impact On Mental Health For Women Who Have Miscarried

Miscarriage and stillbirth can be devastating for any woman. The depression and anxiety faced after their loss can be extremely long lasting. Research published today in the British Journal of Psychiatry suggests depression and anxiety can still affect women who have previously miscarried or had a still birth, even after the arrival of a healthy baby.

The research, conducted by the University of Rochester Medical Center, suggests the birth of a healthy child does not resolve mental health problems many women experienced after the loss of a pregnancy or child. Furthermore, the research could be helpful in determining the potential risks of postnatal depression occurring.