psychology research

Income Inequality Leads To More US Deaths, New Study Finds

Income Inequality Leads To More US Deaths, New Study Finds

A new study provides the best evidence to date that higher levels of income inequality in the United States actually lead to more deaths in the country over a period of years.

Are Women With a History of Violent Experiences More Likely to Have Risky Sex?

Are Women With a History of Violent Experiences More Likely to Have Risky Sex?

Women who have experienced multiple forms of violence, from witnessing neighborhood crimes to being abused themselves, are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, according to a new report in the Psychology of Violence.

The Gifts We Keep On Giving

The Gifts We Keep On Giving

In an article to be published in a forthcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, researchers from Stanford Graduate School of Business, the Harvard Business School and the London Business School explore the whole question of regifting from the perspective of both the original giver and the receiver who may or may not rewrap and regift.

US Army Considers Why Some Soldiers Avoid PTSD Care, And Strategies For Continued Treatment

US Army Considers Why Some Soldiers Avoid PTSD Care, And Strategies For Continued Treatment

Currently, fewer than half of the Soldiers who report symptoms of combat-related PTSD receive the care they need. And of those Soldiers who do start treatment, between 20 percent and 50 percent walk away before its completion.

New Research about Facebook Addiction

New Research about Facebook Addiction

Are you a social media enthusiast or simply a Facebook addict? Researchers from Norway have developed a new instrument to measure Facebook addiction, the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale.

A Profile Picture Tells A Thousand Words On Facebook

A Profile Picture Tells A Thousand Words On Facebook

The old adage that a picture speaks a thousand words appears to be true, especially when it comes to our social network pictures, a new report from Ohio State University suggests. According to the research, social network users consider your profile picture more than your profile content information to form first impressions of you. However, this is only apparent if the photograph displayed on your profile shows you in a positive light.

Does What We Listen To Impact How We Support Other Social Groups?

Does What We Listen To Impact How We Support Other Social Groups?

Does what we listen to impact how we support other social groups? A new report released by Ohio State University suggests it does. According to the research, listening to a few minutes of different types of music can influence how we offer support to other ethnic groups. Students who were exposed to mainstream, top 40 pop music were more inclined to offer equal support for other student groups, while those exposed to traditional rock music were more inclined to support student groups associated with ‘white’ causes. Unsurprisingly, those who were exposed to ‘white power’ music gave most support for the conventionally ‘white’ causes, and far less support to the African-American and Arab-American student groups.

High School Bullies More Likely To Be Substance Users

High School Bullies More Likely To Be Substance Users

A new study released by researchers for Ohio State University points to increased substance use for bullies of middle and high school age. The research demonstrated that bullying was more prevalent within the middle school age group, and an increased substance use was seen in high school aged bullies. Additionally, victims of bullies were more likely to embark in fairly frequent substance use, with alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use being cited as most commonly used.

Genetic Origins To Antisocial Behavior Examined

Genetic Origins To Antisocial Behavior Examined

A new report released by researches at Sam Houston State University considers the roles of genetics and environmental influences in relation to antisocial behavior. It has long been considered that a person’s biology can account, in part, for the way they behave. However, the application to this concept is still relatively new to criminology.

Further Cardiac Related Hospitalization In Heart Attack Patients With Depression

Further Cardiac Related Hospitalization In Heart Attack Patients With Depression

New research released by Tel Aviv University today suggests heart attack patients with a history of depression are more likely to be re-admitted to hospital with additional cardiac health problems. For patients with depression, it is hoped that further medical assistance be administered to help manage depression, in addition to general lifestyle changes such as weight loss and smoking cessation.