psychology research

Psychosomatic Symptoms Linked With Physical Abuse In Children

Psychosomatic Symptoms Linked With Physical Abuse In Children

Researchers in Sweden have uncover a link between psychosomatic symptoms, such as aches, pains and sleep disorders in children and physical abuse. The report states that the level of reporting psychosomatic symptoms rose in children who were not only physically abused, but who also witnessed intimate partner violence at home.

Low Dopamine Levels Linked To Relapse For Ex-Smokers

Low Dopamine Levels Linked To Relapse For Ex-Smokers

Research undertaken by scientists at Baylor College of Medicine takes big steps in helping to explain why it is so hard for smokers to quit their addiction. Smoking enhances dopamine release, and when a smoker attempts to quit, dopamine levels lower significantly. The lapse in dopamine levels can prompt a relapse for smokers who are trying to quit. The authors suggest medications which could elevate dopamine levels when a smoker is trying to quit, could be key to a non-smoking life style and help to prevent relapse.

More Rapid Cognitive Decline In Male Smokers

More Rapid Cognitive Decline In Male Smokers

New research from University College London suggests smoking is associated with more rapid cognitive decline in males. Additionally, men who continue to smoke experience greater cognitive decline than those who quit during the experimental time frame.

Facebook Counterproductive For People With Low Self Esteem

Facebook Counterproductive For People With Low Self Esteem

Theoretically, it could be assumed that social networking websites would be fantastic outlets for those with low self-esteem as it would provide them with a platform to build friendships. However, new research published in Psychological Science suggests Facebook could actually make a person with low self-esteem could be counterproductive. It was also discovered that people with low self esteem tend to be more negative when posting updates and messages on friends profiles. When people with low self-esteem posted more positive messages, they tended to get more feedback from their real friends.

How We Perceive Illness Might Influence Health Outcomes

How We Perceive Illness Might Influence Health Outcomes

New research published in the APA’s Current Directions in Psychological Science suggests that how we perceive personal illness might affect our health outcomes. The study, released in February’s edition of the journal, suggests how a person perceives their illness might play a detrimental role in determining the health outcome, more so than the actual severity of their illness.

Education Choices Could Be Shaped By Family History Of Psychiatric Disorders

Education Choices Could Be Shaped By Family History Of Psychiatric Disorders

There was never any doubt for me as to why I entered into a psychology degree. My mother had pretty server mental health problems all through my childhood, and I knew that when I grew up, I wanted to understand her problems and help others the best I could. New research released in PLoSONE suggests our higher education choices could be shaped by a family history of mental disorders. Researchers discovered students who were interested in pursuing humanities or social science degrees were twice as likely to report a history of mood disorders or substance abuse with a family member. Those more interested in pursuing science related degrees were three times more likely to report a history of ASD with a sibling.

Study Challenges Link Between Worker Happiness And Productivity

Study Challenges Link Between Worker Happiness And Productivity

A new study published by SAGE challenges the link between worker happiness and productivity. The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Leicester, suggests that while higher involvement management of workers can positively effect productivity and quality of work, it does not reduce absenteeism, job satisfaction or workplace anxiety.

Could Where You Vote Have An Impact On How You Vote?

Could Where You Vote Have An Impact On How You Vote?

A new report released by Baylor suggests religious priming can influence how people vote. According to the study, which looked at survey results from the UK and the Netherlands, people who responded to questions about their political beliefs next to churches reported themselves as being more politically conservative than those who responded outside governmental buildings. Additionally, those who were surveyed outside of churches tended to have a more negative attitude towards non-religious people. The impact of this could mean that people who vote within a church, rather than a school or other voting station, would be more inclined to vote for a conservative candidate or proposition.

Study Suggests Gossiping Has Some Positive Psychological Benefits

Study Suggests Gossiping Has Some Positive Psychological Benefits

Have you ever been told that it is rude or bad to gossip? A new study released by UC Berkeley suggests that idle gossip might have some psychologically positive upsides after all. Not only can gossip provide a cathartic and therapeutic outlet for lowering stress, gossip can help us to prevent exploitation and police the bad behavior in others, the study suggests.

Treating Depression In Employees Can Significantly Increase Work Productivity

Treating Depression In Employees Can Significantly Increase Work Productivity

New research released by the Centre for Addition and Mental Health suggests treating depression in employees while they are still working can significantly improve their work productivity.