Category: Addiction

Anti-tobacco Ads Help Adults Quit, But Only If They Are Not From The Tobacco Industry

New research released in April’s American Journal of Public Health discovered anti-tobacco advertising does help reduce the need to spark up in adults, however only when the ads are from sponsors not associated with the tobacco industry. In states where anti-tobacco ads were sponsored by private initiatives, pharmaceutical and the state itself, the anti smoking message had greater impact. Ads created or sponsored directly by the tobacco industry prompted more smoking in states which ran these campaigns. However, although the anti-smoking ads delivered by pharmaceutical companies were more effective in getting people to smoke less, running ads for cessation products appear to have turned people off potentially quitting their addiction.

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High School Bullies More Likely To Be Substance Users

A new study released by researchers for Ohio State University points to increased substance use for bullies of middle and high school age. The research demonstrated that bullying was more prevalent within the middle school age group, and an increased substance use was seen in high school aged bullies. Additionally, victims of bullies were more likely to embark in fairly frequent substance use, with alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use being cited as most commonly used.

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Low Dopamine Levels Linked To Relapse For Ex-Smokers

Research undertaken by scientists at Baylor College of Medicine takes big steps in helping to explain why it is so hard for smokers to quit their addiction. Smoking enhances dopamine release, and when a smoker attempts to quit, dopamine levels lower significantly. The lapse in dopamine levels can prompt a relapse for smokers who are trying to quit. The authors suggest medications which could elevate dopamine levels when a smoker is trying to quit, could be key to a non-smoking life style and help to prevent relapse.

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Making sense of addiction terminology

A new editorial released this week offers clarity and structure on confusing drug and alcohol addiction terminology for prescribers, users and regulators. “Through a glass darkly: can we improve clarity about mechanism and aims of medications in drug and alcohol treatments?” is published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, the official journal of the British Association for Psychopharmacology, published by SAGE.

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Addiction Roots Dependent Upon A Person’s Sex?

A new report from Yale researchers considers the different biological mechanisms associated with cocaine addiction between men and women. It is hoped that the study could shed some light onto effective therapies to help curb cravings, and ultimately break the addiction cycle based upon the sex of the patient. The findings so far suggest that women could benefit from stress reduction therapies, while men might benefit more from cognitive behavioral therapies or more traditional 12 step programs.

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Difference In Brain Responses To Risky Decision Making For Teens With A Family History Of Alcoholism

A new study by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University, which is to be published in April’s issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, suggests that there could be different responses apparent in the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex in teens with a family history of alcoholism, during risky decision making tasks.

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Bar Violence Linked To Happy Hours

A new report produced by Cardiff University explores the link between happy hour in bars and pub violence. The research, which was conducted across five different cities in the UK, found that establishments with the highest levels of violence were most likely to have promotional prices on alcohol. Additionally, bars with higher reported levels of violence tended to have higher levels of customer intoxication between entering and exiting the venue.

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