Clinical Psychology

Latest breaking clinical psychology news and research from Clinically Psyched.

In Pain? Relieve Yourself By Keeping You Brain Busy

In Pain? Relieve Yourself By Keeping You Brain Busy

A new study published in Psychological Science this week has shown that it could be possible to boost pain relief by keeping the brain active. The study suggests that embarking in a memory task can help to reduce pain by distracting the patient. The findings could provide additional avenues to consider for effective pain management.

Genetic Clues To PTSD?

Genetic Clues To PTSD?

New research released today in PLoS ONE could help to find new treatment options for people suffering from high anxiety disorders such as PTSD. Using mice, researchers at Rutgers have identified genetic clues which pinpoint why some are more resilient to traumatic experiences, while others are still fearful once removed from potentially dangerous situations.

Autism More Prevalent Than Thought In Adults With Learning Difficulties, Study Finds

Autism More Prevalent Than Thought In Adults With Learning Difficulties, Study Finds

A study released by researchers from the University of Leicester has revealed a previously ‘invisible’ group of adults with autism within the UK. The study found that 60% of men and 43% of women with profound learning difficulties have autism, refuting previous estimates of lower rates of autism within these specific groups. The finding is vital as it can lead to new support services for those adults who have autism and learning difficulties.

Treating Depression In Employees Can Significantly Increase Work Productivity

Treating Depression In Employees Can Significantly Increase Work Productivity

New research released by the Centre for Addition and Mental Health suggests treating depression in employees while they are still working can significantly improve their work productivity.

Blogging’s Positive Psychological Benefit For Socially Distressed Teens

Blogging’s Positive Psychological Benefit For Socially Distressed Teens

New research published by the APA in the journal Psychological Services suggests blogging can have positive psychological benefits for teens dealing with social problems. The report suggests that while conventional journal keeping can be a great emotional release for teens facing social distress, blogging can provide a more beneficial outlet as the medium allows for open comments from readers. Most interactions and comments to participants blogs within this study were supportive and offered positive advice.

Dehumanized Perceptions Could Facilitate Torture And Genocide

Dehumanized Perceptions Could Facilitate Torture And Genocide

A father in Louisiana bludgeoned and beheaded his disabled 7-year-old son last August because he no longer wanted to care for the boy.

Horticultural Activities Improve Stress Levels In Mentally Challenged Adults

Horticultural Activities Improve Stress Levels In Mentally Challenged Adults

Participation in horticultural activities can improve confidence and social skills, cultivate a positive attitude, and rejuvenate the mind and body.

Depressive Symptoms And Physical Impairment Long Term Effects Of ALI

Depressive Symptoms And Physical Impairment Long Term Effects Of ALI

Depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are frequent and long-lasting after ALI Depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were common and long-lasting during the first two years following acute lung injury (ALI), according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Depressive symptoms were an independent risk factor for impaired physical function. […]

Growing Evidence For Chronic Serotonin Loss In Ecstasy Users

Growing Evidence For Chronic Serotonin Loss In Ecstasy Users

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have discovered that recreational use of the ‘rave drug’ ecstasy produces long term serotonin neurotoxicity.

Bottling Up Your Emotions Could Make You More Aggressive

Bottling Up Your Emotions Could Make You More Aggressive

The research utilized two notoriously disturbing scenes from the movies “The Meaning of Life” (1983) and “Trainspotting” (1996). Asking a selected group of test subjects to suppress or show no emotional reaction to the scenes, researchers discovered that more aggression was apparent during the second phase of the study. By contrast, subjects who were allowed to demonstrate their revulsion to the scenes were far less inclined to show exaggerated aggression during the second phase.