Mental Health

News about mental health research for patients, families and professionals.

Postpartum Depression Spans Generations

Postpartum Depression Spans Generations

Exposure to social stress impairs a mother’s ability to care for her children and can negatively impact her daughter’s ability to provide maternal care for future offspring, a new study shows.

Low-income Pregnant Women in Rural Areas Experience High Levels of Stress: Mothers’ and Babies’ Health at Risk

Low-income Pregnant Women in Rural Areas Experience High Levels of Stress: Mothers’ and Babies’ Health at Risk

A new study indicates low-income pregnant women in rural areas experience high levels of stress yet lack appropriate means to manage their emotional and physical well-being.

Reporting Potentially Violent Patients Is Not Going To Curb Gun Violence, Mental Health Professionals Say

Reporting Potentially Violent Patients Is Not Going To Curb Gun Violence, Mental Health Professionals Say

In response to the new gun law passed in New York on January 15th, some mental health professionals are claiming that reporting patients with a tenancy toward violence is not going to help resolve gun violence issues.

Move to Less Impoverished Neighborhoods Boosts Physical and Mental Health

Move to Less Impoverished Neighborhoods Boosts Physical and Mental Health

Moving from a high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhood spurs long-term gains in the physical and mental health of low-income adults, as well as a substantial increase in their happiness, despite not improving economic self-sufficiency.

Preventing Depression Requires Proactive Interventions by Health-Care System

Preventing Depression Requires Proactive Interventions by Health-Care System

Major depressive episodes can be prevented, and to help ensure that they are, the health care system should provide routine access to depression-prevention interventions, just as patients receive standard vaccines, according to a new article co-authored by UCSF researcher Ricardo F. Muñoz, PhD.

Cannabis Use During Youth Affects Brain Regions Associated With Schizophrenia

Cannabis Use During Youth Affects Brain Regions Associated With Schizophrenia

New research from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) published in Nature’s Neuropsychopharmacology has shown physical changes to exist in specific brain areas implicated in schizophrenia following the use of cannabis during adolescence. The research has shown how cannabis use during adolescence can interact with a gene, called the COMT gene, to cause physical changes in the brain.

US Army Considers Why Some Soldiers Avoid PTSD Care, And Strategies For Continued Treatment

US Army Considers Why Some Soldiers Avoid PTSD Care, And Strategies For Continued Treatment

Currently, fewer than half of the Soldiers who report symptoms of combat-related PTSD receive the care they need. And of those Soldiers who do start treatment, between 20 percent and 50 percent walk away before its completion.

Schizophrenia Linked To Childhood Trauma

Schizophrenia Linked To Childhood Trauma

Children who experience sever trauma are three times more likely than the counterparts to develop schizophrenia in adulthood, a new study from the University of Liverpool has discovered. It has long been considered that genetics and environmental factors play a part in the development of psychosis, but this is the first study of its kind to discover a link to early life trauma. Additionally, researchers discovered different types of trauma lead to different expression of symptoms. Those children who were sexually abused where more likely to report hallucinations later in life, while those raised in a children’s home more often exhibited paranoia.

Depression Risk Elevated In Teens Who Use Speed And Ecstasy

Depression Risk Elevated In Teens Who Use Speed And Ecstasy

Teens who use meth-ampthetamine or ecstasy have a significantly higher risk of suffering from elevated depressive symptoms within 12 months, a new study has discovered.

Suicidal Thoughts Linked To Experiences Of War Time Killing For Vietnam-era Veterans

Suicidal Thoughts Linked To Experiences Of War Time Killing For Vietnam-era Veterans

New research published this month in Depression and Anxiety considers the link between killing in war time and later suicidal thoughts in Vietnam-era veterans. The study discovered veterans were twice as likely to have reported suicidal thoughts if they had faced more direct experience involving killing, that those veterans who had few to no experiences of killing. For the purpose of this study, researchers defined four variables to evaluate the ‘experience of killing’; these include killing enemy soldiers, prisoners general civilians and killing or injuring women, children or the elderly.

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