Psychology Research

Latest breaking psychology research news from Clinically Psyched.

Reappraisal Defuses Strong Emotional Responses to Israel-Palestine Conflict

Reappraisal Defuses Strong Emotional Responses to Israel-Palestine Conflict

Reappraisal is a widely-used cognitive strategy that can help people to regulate their reactions to emotionally charged events. Now, new research suggests that reappraisal may even be effective in changing people’s emotional responses in the context of one of the most intractable conflicts worldwide: the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Your Body Doesn’t Lie: People Ignore Political Ads of Candidates They Oppose

Your Body Doesn’t Lie: People Ignore Political Ads of Candidates They Oppose

A recent study examined people’s bodily responses while watching presidential campaign ads – and discovered another way that people avoid political information that challenges their beliefs.

Kids with Behavior Issues, Disabilities are Bullied More, Bully Others More

Kids with Behavior Issues, Disabilities are Bullied More, Bully Others More

Students receiving special-education services for behavioral disorders and those with more obvious disabilities are more likely to be bullied than their general-education counterparts; and are also more likely to bully other students, a new study shows.

Young Children of Unmarried Parents Fare Worse when a Father’s Support is Court-Ordered

Young Children of Unmarried Parents Fare Worse when a Father’s Support is Court-Ordered

Young children of unmarried parents who live with their mother and receive court-mandated financial support from their father exhibit more aggressive behavior than those who don’t get any formal support at all, according to a Rutgers University study.

Blood Test Could Show Women at Risk of Postnatal Depression

Blood Test Could Show Women at Risk of Postnatal Depression

Researchers at Warwick Medical School have discovered a way of identifying which women are most at risk of postnatal depression (PND) by checking for specific genetic variants. The findings could lead to the development of a simple, accurate blood test which checks for the likelihood of developing the condition.

Addiction On The Rise In European Youth

Addiction On The Rise In European Youth

Addiction is on the rise in Europe. An increasing number of young people are unable to control their use of drugs, alcohol, sex, computer games, technology, shopping, dieting or exercise.

Income Inequality Leads To More US Deaths, New Study Finds

Income Inequality Leads To More US Deaths, New Study Finds

A new study provides the best evidence to date that higher levels of income inequality in the United States actually lead to more deaths in the country over a period of years.

The Gifts We Keep On Giving

The Gifts We Keep On Giving

In an article to be published in a forthcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, researchers from Stanford Graduate School of Business, the Harvard Business School and the London Business School explore the whole question of regifting from the perspective of both the original giver and the receiver who may or may not rewrap and regift.

New Research about Facebook Addiction

New Research about Facebook Addiction

Are you a social media enthusiast or simply a Facebook addict? Researchers from Norway have developed a new instrument to measure Facebook addiction, the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale.

UCLA Utilize Neuromarketing To Find Most Effective Anti-Smoking Ads

UCLA Utilize Neuromarketing To Find Most Effective Anti-Smoking Ads

If you follow the field of neuromarketing, you may be aware that what we report liking or finding most effective is often very different from what our brains tell us we really like. This has again been reported in a new study by researchers at UCLA who looked at both self reported preference and brain responses to public service announcements in relation to smoking cessation.

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