Psychology Research

Latest breaking psychology research news from Clinically Psyched.

Anti-tobacco Ads Help Adults Quit, But Only If They Are Not From The Tobacco Industry

Anti-tobacco Ads Help Adults Quit, But Only If They Are Not From The Tobacco Industry

New research released in April’s American Journal of Public Health discovered anti-tobacco advertising does help reduce the need to spark up in adults, however only when the ads are from sponsors not associated with the tobacco industry. In states where anti-tobacco ads were sponsored by private initiatives, pharmaceutical and the state itself, the anti smoking message had greater impact. Ads created or sponsored directly by the tobacco industry prompted more smoking in states which ran these campaigns. However, although the anti-smoking ads delivered by pharmaceutical companies were more effective in getting people to smoke less, running ads for cessation products appear to have turned people off potentially quitting their addiction.

Fragile X Syndrome Reversed In Adult Mice

Fragile X Syndrome Reversed In Adult Mice

New research published this month in Neuron has found a newly developed mGlu5 inhibitor, CTEP, is effect at reversing many symptoms associated with Fragile X syndrome in adult mouse models. While CTEP isn’t currently being developed for humans, the researchers have pointed out that their findings are significant for understanding the condition. FXS, they suggest, is not the result of an irreversible disruption of brain development.

Increased Risk Of Suicide And Cardiovascular Death Immediately After Cancer Diagnosis

Increased Risk Of Suicide And Cardiovascular Death Immediately After Cancer Diagnosis

New research released in The New England Journal of Medicine this month suggests there is an increased risk of suicide and cardiovascular death for cancer patients in the period immediately following their diagnosis. While previous studies have shown similar increased risks in patients living long term with the disease, this is the first notable study of its type to correlate suicide and heart related stresses to coincide with the diagnosis of cancer.

Spontaneous gene glitches linked to autism risk with older dads

Spontaneous gene glitches linked to autism risk with older dads

Researchers have turned up a new clue to the workings of a possible environmental factor in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs): fathers were four times more likely than mothers to transmit tiny, spontaneous mutations to their children with the disorders. Moreover, the number of such transmitted genetic glitches increased with paternal age. The discovery may help to explain earlier evidence linking autism risk to older fathers.

A Profile Picture Tells A Thousand Words On Facebook

A Profile Picture Tells A Thousand Words On Facebook

The old adage that a picture speaks a thousand words appears to be true, especially when it comes to our social network pictures, a new report from Ohio State University suggests. According to the research, social network users consider your profile picture more than your profile content information to form first impressions of you. However, this is only apparent if the photograph displayed on your profile shows you in a positive light.

Does What We Listen To Impact How We Support Other Social Groups?

Does What We Listen To Impact How We Support Other Social Groups?

Does what we listen to impact how we support other social groups? A new report released by Ohio State University suggests it does. According to the research, listening to a few minutes of different types of music can influence how we offer support to other ethnic groups. Students who were exposed to mainstream, top 40 pop music were more inclined to offer equal support for other student groups, while those exposed to traditional rock music were more inclined to support student groups associated with ‘white’ causes. Unsurprisingly, those who were exposed to ‘white power’ music gave most support for the conventionally ‘white’ causes, and far less support to the African-American and Arab-American student groups.

High School Bullies More Likely To Be Substance Users

High School Bullies More Likely To Be Substance Users

A new study released by researchers for Ohio State University points to increased substance use for bullies of middle and high school age. The research demonstrated that bullying was more prevalent within the middle school age group, and an increased substance use was seen in high school aged bullies. Additionally, victims of bullies were more likely to embark in fairly frequent substance use, with alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use being cited as most commonly used.

Could Bulimia Be A Weight And Eating Disorder?

Could Bulimia Be A Weight And Eating Disorder?

A new study released by researchers at Drexel University suggests a majority of women with bulimia reach their highest ever body weight after developing the disease.

Genetic Origins To Antisocial Behavior Examined

Genetic Origins To Antisocial Behavior Examined

A new report released by researches at Sam Houston State University considers the roles of genetics and environmental influences in relation to antisocial behavior. It has long been considered that a person’s biology can account, in part, for the way they behave. However, the application to this concept is still relatively new to criminology.

Further Cardiac Related Hospitalization In Heart Attack Patients With Depression

Further Cardiac Related Hospitalization In Heart Attack Patients With Depression

New research released by Tel Aviv University today suggests heart attack patients with a history of depression are more likely to be re-admitted to hospital with additional cardiac health problems. For patients with depression, it is hoped that further medical assistance be administered to help manage depression, in addition to general lifestyle changes such as weight loss and smoking cessation.